Conviction of 93-year-old War Veteran is Latest Embarrassment for German Legal System


Last November, Moshe Loth testified as a plaintiff in the trial of wheelchair-bound nonagenarian Bruno Dey.
Loth accused him of being an accessory to his torture and grandmother's gassing during the "Holocaust" at the Stutthof concentration camp in the final years of World War II.
Loth stated that his mother Helene became pregnant with him while interned at Stutthof. As an infant, he was tattooed and subjected to cruel medical experiments. His grandmother Anna was gassed to death, a death affirmed by the Yad Vashem.
In a gesture of Jewish empathy and compassion, he publicly forgave Dey and gave him a hug.
The problem is Moshe was actually born Peter Oswald Loth, to a Protestant German family. His older brother Gustav was a corporal in the Waffen-SS and nobody in his family ever set foot in a concentration camp.
Der Spiegel exposed him during the trial, not because his story was unbelievable, but because he was a Gentile. None of the other witnesses flown in mostly from America and Israel were subjected to the same scrutiny.
Thus the increasing desperation of an insecure German government and Zionist power structure running out of Nazi strawmen to rationalize its totalitarianism and create a climate of fear.
Dey's case was noteworthy from the start due to the bizarre decision to try a 93-year-old man as a juvenile. Dey had previously been questioned and cleared by German police in the 1970s and 80s, yet prosecutors decided to drag him to court at an age where it is unlikely he has any recollection of what happened 75 years ago, or even the soundness of mind to properly defend himself.
German prosecutors charged Dey as an accessory to the murder of 5,230 persons in a camp he briefly served at as a low level soldier. They relied heavily on contemporary precedents of guilt-by-association, pioneered at the trial of John Demjanjuk in 2011. Before Dey, Oskar Groening was convicted under the new German judicial philosophy in 2014. He was convicted of helping kill 300,000 Jews in his capacity as an accountant at Auschwitz.
The accusers did not bother to build a case against Dey, nor incriminate him as an individual in any killings. The entire case was predicated solely on the fact that he was stationed at Stutthof as a conscript in the German military and so he had to have knowledge of supposed gassings and killings-- something Dey vehemently denied and the plaintiffs never proved.
Holocaust trials in Germany are designed to be Kafka traps. It is illegal to question the veracity of atrocities Jews claimed to have seen.
Besides Loth, other "witnesses" gave highly dubious testimony. A woman named Asia Schindelman said she saw the guards at Stutthof feed Jewish women to their dogs, while others were killed by being tossed on electrified fences.
Though the case against Dey was weak even by show trial standards, he was still convicted and given a two year suspended sentence.
Dey's legal team tried to appeal this ludicrous decision but mysteriously dropped their case yesterday before it was ever heard.
With the ruling in Dey's case safe, German jurisprudence now solidly affirms the idea of collective guilt, as the judge overseeing the case made clear in a closing statement.
This is very convenient for the German state. For Holocaust propagandists, they now have a fresh pool of potential subjects to sacrifice to the Shoah God.

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