Jewish Holiday Sukkot Coincided with Event 201 & World Military Games in Wuhan


This was brought to my attention by NordLux in the comment section of a recent show.
Most people are already aware that Bill Gates, Johns Hopkins and the World Economic Forum were simulating a coronavirus pandemic with their Event 201 on October 18, the same day that the World Military Games began in Wuhan, China. What many people might not know is that this coincided with the jewish celebration of Sukkot, which is their weird version of a “harvest” festival.
The following is from kabbalah.info/bb/sukkot-meaning (with my emphasis added)
The holiday of Sukkot represents an essential change of values. By changing our values—from individualistic and egoistic to connective and altruistic—we will be able to create a safe, harmonious and happy world.
Such change requires an assessment of what’s most important in life: self benefit or other people’s benefit? The holiday of Sukkot (the Tabernacle Feast) and the work in conjunction with it, such as the construction of the Sukkah, explains how we can increase the importance of the very small desire we have to benefit others, until it’s greater in importance than all of our self-aimed desires.
The desire to benefit others is called “waste” because we instinctively perceive caring about others as completely unnecessary. That is, our personal concerns—”What will I eat?” “Who will be my partner?” “What will happen to my family?” “How can I make my money and living?”“How can I earn other people’s respect and appreciation?” “How can I achieve my life’s goals?” “How can I meet all my needs?”—easily bury any thought or concern we have to benefit other people.
Is this not exactly what they are programming us with at this very moment? People are being expected to give up on making money, providing for their families, and achieving their goals for the greater good of the public. Their very ability to put food on the table is now in question.
So I did some more digging on this holiday and found some interesting material from a somewhat obscure text.
From The Legends of the Jews (1909) by Louis Ginzberg:
“On the fifteenth of the same month they celebrate the Feast of Tabernacles. They cover the roofs of their houses with foliage, they resort to our parks, where they cut down palm branches for their festal wreaths, pluck the fruit of the Etrog, and cause havoc among the willows of the brook, by breaking down the hedges in their quest after Hosha’not, saying: ‘As does the king in the triumphal procession, so do we.’ Then they repair to their synagogues to pray, and read out of their books, and make circuits with their Hosha’not, all the while jumping and skipping like goats, so that there is no telling whether they curse us or bless us. This is Sukkot, as they call it, and while it lasts, they do none of the king’s service, for, they maintain, all work is forbidden them on these days.
“In this way they waste the whole year with tomfoolery and fiddle-faddle, only in order to avoid doing the king’s service. At the expiration of every period of fifty years they have a jubilee year, and every seventh year is a year of release, during which the land lies fallow, for they neither sow nor reap therein, and sell us neither fruits nor other products of the field, so that those of us who live among them die of hunger. At the end of every period of twelve months, they observe the New Year, at the end of every thirty days the New Moon, and every seventh day is the Sabbath, the day on which, as they say, the Lord of the world rested.”
I honestly am not sure what exactly is being discussed with the timetables here, but the references to not working seems very relevant these days. The prohibition of working the land and causing deliberate famine is also very alarming these days, especially since we know what they did to Ukraine with the Holodomor.

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